facebook vs youtube viddyad

Is Facebook the Best Place for Video Advertising?

It seems the tides are changing in the digital realm, more specifically when it comes to video advertising. If you’re a regular reader of our blog it should be pretty apparent that video advertising is one of the best ways to advertise your business. Not only does video engage consumers better than text and picture but with 80% of users able to recall a video they viewed in the past 30 days, it’s become a necessity for brand recognition and growth.

So you’ve got on board the video advertising train, but your next big question is where is the best place to put said video? Well, you could try digital signage or the even cheaper option of placing it on your website, but you want as many eyeballs to see your video as possible. So you consider the various social media sites. Your first thought for video is probably YouTube, and back in December 2015 most people would agree with you, but as of May 2016, it seems the most popular site for video advertising amongst marketer was Facebook at 65%, with YouTube coming in second at 45%.This is the beginning of a big shift in the go to place to place your video ad, much to Facebook’s delight.

Why do brand prefer Facebook for their video ads? Well according to a study carried out by Wolfgang digital using a video ad on Facebook is not only cheaper than YouTube but will also get your video more impressions. Facebook’s average cost per thousand impressions is €0.98 whereas YouTube’s cost per thousand impressions is around €4.31. The same study also found that Facebook garnered more hours of views for video ads over YouTube. However, the quality of views on YouTube is higher than on Facebook. This means that more people view to the end of the video on YouTube than they do on Facebook. YouTube also works out cheaper than Facebook for quality views.

So how do you pick which is the better option for your video ad? Well if you want as many people as possible (within your budget) to see your video then Facebook might be the best option for you. If you want people to watch your entire video then YouTube is probably a better option. The difference between the two channels is understandable. When a user goes to YouTube they are specifically seeking out video, so they are already in the mindset to watch a video, so if your video ad catches user attention it is more natural for the user to watch to the end of your ad. On Facebook however people seek a number of different things, updates from friends, news and maybe some funny photos. Video isn’t what they are specifically looking for, but Facebook does a good job of allowing videos ads to be watched. All videos and video ads appear natively within the Facebook timeline, so it’s easy for people to watch them. Even better the user doesn’t even have to click play because videos autoplay in the newsfeed as a user scrolls past.

So while marketers are making the move to Facebook over YouTube it is important not to jump to the easy conclusion that your brand also needs to be doing video ads on Facebook like everyone else. The right platform comes down to your specific business needs and goals, but if you still can’t make up your mind, you can always just try both platforms and analyse your results later.

Create a great video ad for Facebook and YouTube at www.viddyad.com

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Video ads of Dove Real beauty

Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame: Dove Real Beauty Sketches

“You are more beautiful than you think.”

This statement may seem like an intimate assurance from mother to daughter, or from friend to friend.

In fact, it is an assurance made by Dove to their customers. Since 2004, Dove has striven to change the way women view themselves through a powerful, mission-driven ad campaign called the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty. The campaign stemmed from research findings that suggested only 2% of women saw themselves as beautiful. In these grim findings, Dove saw an opportunity to change public perception of beauty and position themselves as a brand that champions the natural beauty of their customers.

In 2013, Dove released the viral video ad “Dove Real Beauty Sketches.” According to Dove, the ad is meant to “explore the gap between how others perceive us and how we perceive ourselves.” It quickly became the most-watched video ad of all time, and now has over three thousand YouTube comments from viewers who were moved to tears by the video’s message.

 

The faces of the Dove campaign are not superstars or top models. They are the un-photoshopped faces of everyday people. In recent years, other companies have followed Dove’s move to celebrate the everywoman. One example is the lingerie brand Aerie, which launched their Aerie Real campaign in 2014.

The Dove Campaign for Real Beauty has become more than an ad campaign: it has become a social initiative for change. It has revolutionized the way beauty brands market to their customers and has set the standard for mission-driven marketing.

Consumers are becoming more conscious about the environmental and ethical impacts of their shopping habits. Increasingly, shoppers are looking for products with the fairtrade label, which indicates that the goods were produced under fair working conditions. Brands like Dove appeal to consumers who buy with their hearts, not just their minds.

Dove shows us that a marketing campaign can do more than raise profits. Through their marketing campaigns, companies can show potential customers what drives them, what their values are, and what they are doing to make the world a better place.

 

 

Create a video ad at www.viddyad.com today, and your ad might just make our hall of fame some day.

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Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame: Our Blades Are F***ing Great

Becoming an instant billionaire? Sounds f***ing great.

Yesterday, Fortune announced that Dollar Shave Club, a startup that ships razors directly to subscribers’ homes each month, sold to Unilever for a whopping $1 billion.

The Dollar Shave Club brand exploded into the public consciousness in 2012, when the company released what can only be described as an exercise in absurdist advertising.

The video ad—which features Dollar Shave Club Founder Mike Dubin, a man in a bear suit, and the f-bomb—has almost 23 million views on YouTube. The success of Dollar Shave Club and their Little-Ad-That-Could confirms what great advertisers have been saying all along: advertising and playing it safe have no business being together.

As David Ogilvy, described by some as the Father of Advertising, famously said: “Don’t bunt. Aim out of the ball park. Aim for the company of immortals.”

Dollar Shave Club certainly hit it out of the park. Dubin, who has a background in improv comedy, explained that he wrote the ad in an attempt to stand out from brands that take themselves too seriously.

He said, “The world is filled with bad commercials and people who are marketing too hard. I think what we wanted to do is not take ourselves too seriously, and deliver an irreverent smart tone.”

This irreverence has certainly inspired copycats. The Dollar Beard Club, which claims to be the manlier alternative to the Dollar Shave Club, piggybacked off of Dubin’s great idea and gained quite a following of their own.

2 million views? Not too shabby.

There is something to be learned from both the Dollar Beard and Dollar Shave Clubs. First, if you see a strategy that works for someone else, try it out: there is a chance it will work for you too. There is no shame in learning from the success of others.

Finally, take risks. Be irreverent. Dust off that old sense of humor and try it on, even if it’s a bit strange and you’re worried it will weird people out.

If you’re feeling exceptionally brave, you could even try to float some puns. It seems to have worked for the Dollar Shave Club.

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Each Thursday, the Viddyad team will choose a new commercial to add to our Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame. If you have any nominees (video advertisements that made you laugh, made you cry, stood the test of time, or made you go “WHOA”) let us know! Comment below or shoot us an email at social@viddyad.com.

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Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame: Generic Brand Video

An old adage tells us that laughter is the best medicine. It’s also the best relief during tense discussions, the best way to appear friendlier than you actually are, and the best way to seem cool even after you trip in front of a bunch of people.

Most importantly, laughter is the best way to build an emotional connection with others. Funny video advertisements have the ability to generate warm feelings and a sense of camaraderie between advertiser and viewer. Advertisements that make people laugh tend to be tweeted, retweeted, replayed and remembered.

One such advertisement is Dissolve’s “This is a Generic Brand Video,” which won the 2015 Shorty Award for Best in B2B (business to business). The Shorty Awards honor the most influential voices in social media, which is a pretty big deal considering how important social media has become in the life of the modern consumer.

“This is a Generic Brand Video” pokes fun at formulaic brand advertisements, which have a predictability and absurdity that may not be apparent upon first viewing, but which nevertheless seem familiar when Dissolve points them out:

 

Dissolve’s video is a good reference point for advertisers who want to see what to do and what NOT to do. The use of cliches and the lack of sincerity or logic in advertising, which Dissolve is making fun of, should be avoided at all costs. Viewers are smart and tend to notice when an advertisement is disingenuous. When making an advertisement, companies should stick to what’s true, and not just what they think viewers want to hear.

When making a video ad, consider using Dissolve’s tactic of sharp humor. This video is impactful because it doesn’t insult viewers’ intelligence; in fact, it makes it seem like Dissolve and viewers are in on a joke together. Most interestingly, the use of humor covers up the fact that the video is itself an advertisement. Through this video, Dissolve is able to gain brand recognition, free publicity, and hits to their website, all while giving viewers a good time.

 

Each Thursday, the Viddyad team will choose a new commercial to add to our Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame. If you have any nominees (video advertisements that made you laugh, made you cry, stood the test of time, or made you go “WHOA”) let us know! Comment below or shoot us an email at social@viddyad.com.

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Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame: Daisy Ad

There are some video advertisements that our eyes see but our brains don’t register. There are some ads that we forget as soon as we see them. Other ads may have a catchy jingle that gets stuck in our heads for awhile, or even a slogan that we can recite years later. And then there are the ads that stick with us forever; that capture us, move us, and change us. The Daisy Ad is one of those ads.

 

Released in 1964, the Daisy Ad was the mother of the modern political attack ad. The advertisement was made for the presidential campaign of Lyndon B. Johnson, who had entered the oval office in 1963 when JFK was assassinated. In 1964, he was defending his presidency against Republican candidate Barry Goldwater.

Before the Daisy Ad, presidential candidates weren’t expected to exchange the vicious, emotionally-charged attack ads Americans are accustomed to these days. Take, for example, JFK’s 1960 presidential election ad:

 

It’s a cute tune: that’s for sure. But if presumptive 2016 presidential candidates Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton ran an ad like this, they’d likely face the wrath of endless internet trolls. (Don’t believe us? Ask Mitch McConnell.)

Political ads today have some teeth to them. More importantly, they have the ability to tug at viewers’ most powerful emotions, like anger and fear. For this, we have the Doyle Dane Bernbach ad agency to thank. They are the masterminds behind the Daisy Ad, and since they hit the scene, the ad world just hasn’t been the same.

According to the Smithsonian Magazine, the DDB agency had a policy of treating advertising like art, not science. The founder of the company would tell his employees “Playing it safe can be the most dangerous thing in the world, because you’re presenting people with an idea they’ve seen before, and you won’t have an impact.”

The DDB agency truly practiced what they preached. The Daisy ad had the impact of, well, an atomic bomb—not only on the political advertising landscape, but on the hearts of viewers. The ad made such a big impact, in fact, that the advertisers only had to pay to broadcast it one time; after that, the news networks picked it up and played it for free.

So, how can you make an ad that’s as powerful as the Daisy ad?

Prioritize pathos.

Appeal to the emotions and values of viewers, instead of simply their logic. Yes, your product or service may have many convenient and practical features. But there is also something about your business that will pull on the heartstrings of your viewers. Maybe it’s that you took over the company when your father or mother passed away. Maybe it’s that you give a percentage of your proceeds to charity. If you can remind viewers of your goodness—of your humanity—then your advertisement will have the impact of the Daisy Ad (sans atomic bomb).

Each Thursday, the Viddyad team will choose a new commercial to add to our Video Ad Campaign Hall of Fame. If you have any nominees (video advertisements that made you laugh, made you cry, stood the test of time, or made you go “WHOA”) let us know! Comment below or shoot us an email at social@viddyad.com.

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